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Nimrod MRA4
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Specifications

    Primary Function:
    Crew:
    Engines:
    Thrust:
    Weight Empty:
    Max. Weight:
    Guns:
    Hardpoints:
    Ordnance:
    Length:
    Wingspan:
    Max. Speed:
    Climb Rate:
    Range:
    Ceiling:
    First Flight:
    Year Delievered:
maritime patrol
ten
RR turbofans
4 x 15,500 lbs. ea.
114,000 lbs.
232,300 lbs.
none
four
22,000 lbs.
126' 9"
127' 0"
570 mph
2,700 fpm
6,900 miles
36,000 feet
9/10/09
2010






The concept of the Nimrod MRA4 dates back to 1992 when the British government asked BAE for a replacement to its aging Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft. Functions of the aircraft would include reconnaissance, anti submarine warfare, electronic information, anti-shipping attack, and search and rescue.

Originally 21 aircraft were proposed, but due to budget constraints and higher production costs, eventually it was decided that 9 new airplanes would be built.

BAE proposed that the new aircraft be built using the existing Nimrod fuselage and overall design. Work on the Nimrod MRA4 began in 1999. Only about seven percent of the parts are used from the existing Nimrod. The MRA4 has more powerful and efficient engines, more aerodynamic wings which produce more lift, and a fuselage that is lighter and stronger than the original.

New avionics of the Nimrod MRA4 provide about 1/5 additional data gathering and processing than its predecessor, while range and maximum flight time of the new aircraft is nearly double that of the original Nimrod.

The Nimrod MRA4 was canceled on October 19, 2010 after delivery of a single aircraft in March 2010 with deliveries of the remaining aircraft anticipated by the end of 2012.

A number of changes to the aircraft by the RAF requiring contract modifications, plus production problems with the fuselages, led to cost overruns of about US$1.24 billion and delays in deliveries of some nine years.

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